One Chepang Child Sponsorship Program

Chepang Children under our sponsorship program
Chepang Children under our sponsorship program

Investing $150 a year to Educate Chepang Child
                                 Initiation of Self Sustaining Campaign For Chepang Community

  1. Background Information

Chepangs are one of the most marginalised indigenous groups of 59 officially identified indigenous ethnic communities of Nepal. They are inhabitants of steep sloppy marginalised land of Dhading, Chitwan, Makwanpur and Gorkha districts of Nepal. Chepangs are ancient tribal people who have their own socio-economic and cultural characteristics and are from the Mongoloid group. They are one of the deprived, disadvantaged and marginalized groups of the indigenous people of Nepal. They are still in semi nomadic stage struggling for survival and basic rights that every human being should have got.

Newspaper Articles: please copy pastein the new tab link below to see about Chepang community.

http://www.ekantipur.com/np/2071/10/24/full-story/403377.html \

http://www.hamrakura.com/184768.html#sthash.Esndc68c.CBCru9OD.dpbs

  1. Abstract:

Immediate cause of vulnerability for Chepangs is their lack of education. The Nepal Chepang Association (NCA) reported that more than three quarters of all Chepangs are illiterate and that only one percent of Chepang women know how to read and write, compared to the national average of around 50 percent.

The remoteness of Chepang settlements is regarded as one of the main reasons behind these low literacy rates. Most Chepang villages have only a primary school and students need to travel four to five hours every day, usually over sloped and difficult terrain, to attend secondary level schools. Due to a lack of financial means, few Chepang students can afford to stay in hostels closer to educational facilities. Even though secondary education is officially free in government schools, some School Management Committees are said to collect fees, making higher education unaffordable to most Chepang students.

A general lack of awareness of the importance of education among Chepang parents and the high prevalence of illiteracy also constitute a big obstacle for the education of their children. Faced with serious challenges in maintaining their livelihoods, many Chepang parents take their children out of school to help with household, agricultural and wage work. As a result, the dropout rate is very high among Chepang school children.

One Chepang Child Sponsorship Program will help our Chepang Children to continue their education after grade 5 in Shree Antyodaya JanajatiAwasiya Vidhyalaya. This will help them to get educated and aware about the social, political and general rights that every citizen should get being Nepali in Nepal.

  1. Problem Statement:

The major reason behind Chepang children going off the school is due to their incapability in attending grade 6 after their primary level education. so if we could support these  childrens from grade 6 to SLC ( School Leaving Certificate Level) it will help in one way  or the other. If we could support these children’s and make our own group of wise people we can mobilize them in community upliftment in near future.

  1. Mission:Educating at least one Chepang child from every household of Korak VDC Jimling ward no 3.
  1. About the Project;

The major reason behind Chepangs lagging behind is due to education. If we could enlighten some member of the chepang community they will obviously be a role model in the community and help in the community upliftment. so the main focus of this project is to educate chepang children. The simple process to educate the Chepang child is to sponsor a child annually in Government school.

Let us be a part of Self Sustaining Campaign to support Chepang Community and make them self reliant as the education is the greatest thing in life. Sponsoring one child from your side will be the biggest contribution to the Chepang community. It will change the whole dimension of that Chepang Family. If a child is educated it will obviously help them to get aware about their basic fundamental rights and educate the entire family. Same child can be a backbone for the family to earn and support the whole livelihood of that family.

  1. HOW DOES THE ONE CHEPANG CHILD SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM WORK?
  • How are students selected?

The sponsorship will be based on merit that children’s achieve in their results. Top 10 students from grade 4 based on their final examination will be selected and write their case studies, through home visits, consulting neighbors and only one will be selected from the whole group. We assign women’s groups to select students from their midst, whom they think are particularly needy or deserving of being sponsored. This process will select only one of the meritorious as well as needy students from that community school so as to make the Chepang child sponsorship worth spending in Chepang Community.  We accept both boys and girls.

(I) Can I sponsor a girl child please

Yes, girls are at a particular disadvantage in Nepali society, but we cannot promise you a girl. Members of our women’s groups fully understand the need to educate be girls, and choose girls and boys in equal numbers, because everyone has the right to an education. We have decided to respect the women’s choices and we seem to get an equal number of boys and girls to be sponsored.

  • How long is my commitment?

The sponsor promises to support the child for five years beginning from grade 6 – until the child has passed the SLC- the national school leaving exam given after 10th grade. This is a 5 year contract.

  • What is my Cost?

As a sponsor you will be asked to contribute $150, on March 1st as the new sessions of Nepalese students begins on month of April.  To sign up for this year, Contact Bishwas Chepang.

$30 covers the cost for this year for administrative costs like going for field visits, collecting data, case studies, printing, printing photos etc. for whole 5 year $750 is spent on child.

  • How is my contribution spent?

The School will use the sum to pay for school uniform, supplies, and if applicable tuition, and good nutrition and clothing. The rest of your contribution is a stipend to the family as encouragement to send the child to school instead of work.

15% of your sponsorship fee is kept aside for administration.

The selected students will enroll in school from grade 6.

Grade/

Class

Amount invested to Children Costs of Dress  

Clothing

6 $100 $50 Selection and administrative costs
7 $100 $50 School dress, Casual dress, pair of shoes, Sweater
8 $100 $50 School dress, Casual dress, pair of shoes, Sweater
9 $100 $50 School dress, Casual dress, pair of shoes, Sweater
10 $100 $50 School dress, Casual dress, pair of shoes, Sweater

How can I follow my Child?

You will receive an update on your child twice a year as well as photos, and if at all possible, letters. Our staff in Kathmandu visits your child four times a year, when the family receives one quarter of the annual stipend. Our staff member meets with the child the family and the school to assess your child’s progress and the family situation. If there are problems our staff member tries to help solving them and acts as a resource. She or he also takes pictures and assists with letter writing. A short report is prepared after each visit.

  • How can I establish a personal connection to my child?

You are encouraged to write letters telling her/him about yourself, your family and your world, monetary assistance is also welcome. You will also be taken to their home visits during your preferred vacations and experience rural setting and marginalized indigenous Chepang cultures. You will be assisted by our members for trekking, sightseeing, and given information’s about indigenous knowledge’s information’s practiced in Chepang Community.

  • How do I get started on my Sponsorship?

Upon sending in your contribution, you will receive photos and a profile of the child and the family. The amount of detailed information we have on each family and child at this point varies a great deal.

  1. Where do we enroll our Chepang Child?

Click The Link Below:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Chepang-Children-School-Shree-Antyodaya-Janajati-Awasiya-Vidyalaya/10010862891

Shree Antyodaya Janajati Aawasiya Vidhyalaya
Shree Antyodaya Janajati Aawasiya Vidhyalaya
Shree Antyodaya janajati Aawasiya Vidhyalaya
Shree Antyodaya janajati Aawasiya Vidhyalaya

SHREE ANTYODAYA JANAJATI AWASIYA VIDHAYALAYA is a boarding school that supports Chepang children from the hilly regions, indigenous tribe’s people’s children, to get an education, as well as food and lodging, medication and clothing. There are currently 180 children residing here and classes run from 2 to 8. After grade 8 the children go to another school in nearby area to get their SLC (School Leaving Certificates) with which they can then go on to college. Grade 8, 9 and 10 students are fully supported by the school for their food, lodging, and medication.

Location:
Antyodaya Janajati Awasiya Vidyalaya is located in Khairahani VDC ward no: 1, Karaiya , Chitwan . It is 1.5 km North , from Parsa, the nearest town.
History:
This school was established by the late Kishor Chandra Dhungana in 2000 an inhabitant of the same VDC. The main purpose of the founder was to established the school and thus help to raise the social, financial, educational and political status of the indigenous children from the Chepang community.
Late Kishor Chandra Dhungana spent his valuable life serving the poor and indigenous people. He studied in Banarash, India in a time where not many primary schools where available to children.
A kindhearted person, he wanted to contribute to the indigenous community and his country, Nepal.
He focused his attention on the Chepang community because of their inability to access education due to their location in the hilly and remote villages. The Chepang community is to this day unfamiliar with the development of society , their country and the world.
When the children were initially brought to the new founded school in Karayia, their parents were doubtfull of the intentions. It took some time for the Chepang community to place their trust in the schools good intentions and that only came after they witnessed the results.
Today the school is run by Mr. Dilip Singh Dhungana, who took to the reigns after the sudden death of the founder.

Students from Lother, Korak , Siddhi, and Kaule join this schoolevery year to get an education.
Shree Antyodaya Janajati Awasiya Vidyalaya school for Chepang children has become a symbol of hope for the Chepang people,who are now able to rejoice seeing their children grow up like all other children and dare to dream of the opportunities that will open up for them in their very bright futures.
Although some NGOs and INGOs are financially assisting this school, the funds are not sufficient to cover the needs. We are unable to buy the clothes needed because we don’t have sufficient funds. We are unable to provide stationery materials like note books, practice books, pens, pencil even the text books on time. Our students don’t get the medical treatment for various ailments because it is too expensive.

Our teachers are getting a very minimal salary.  We are all aware of the numerous calls for help that reach you but still hope that our case will merit your favorable consideration. Whatever help that you may care to grant will be of immense value to the community on their difficult path to get out of the vicious cycle of destination.
You are all heartily invited to visit our school and see the progress and results as well as the happy faces of our students for yourself.

Phone number: 00977+ 056 – 582020

Separate Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) has to be signed between four Parties: They are

  • Sponsors
  • Parents
  • School
  • Bishwas Chepang/ Self Sustaining Campaign for Chepang Community

 

Biswash Chepang (SEBS 125 D)

Social Worker at Juvenile Correction Home Sarangkot, Pokhara NEPAL

Ex student of Shree Antyodaya Janajati Aawasiya Vidhayalaya

Contact number: +09779860128786

Email address: 125bishwas@gmail.com

www.bishwaschepang.blogspot.com

www.bishwaschepang.wordpress.com

Volunteering in Chepang Community  

 

Introduction to Chepang Community:          

Chepangs are one of the most marginalised indigenous groups of 59 officially identified indigenous ethnic communities of Nepal. They are inhabitants of steep sloppy marginalised land of Dhading, Chitwan, Makwanpur and Gorkha districts of Nepal. Chepangs are ancient tribal people who have their own socio-economic and cultural characteristics and are from the Mongoloid group. They are one of the deprived, disadvantaged and marginalized groups of the indigenous people of Nepal. They are still in semi nomadic stage struggling for survival and basic rights that every human beings should have got.

Objectives:

  • To conduct need assessment of Chepang Community
  • To aware Chepang community about the Earthquake as natural disaster and remedial measures to stay safe and stay calm.
  • To make them realize that Education is the best means to transform the dark side of this inhuman experience in the society.
  • Improve educational modality of the Government school of Chepang rural village.

 

Why volunteer?

– Learn about the typical tribe and its culture, lifestyle and languages.

– Particularly useful for anthropology, sociology, philanthropy and rural development studies pupil.

– Can attach their volunteering certificates for volunteering at one of the semi nomadic and deprived community of Nepal, which will be beneficial for abroad study visa processing and can get jobs in NGOs (Non Governmental organization).

– Once in a lifetime experience to explore the Chepang Community.

You will have ample opportunities to learn, language, culture, tradition, and even more why there is the vast gap between rich and poor, why people are neglected, why their voice is unheard, why they are compelled to live in vicious cycle of poverty. Do they born for all these oppressions and marginalization?

 

Methodology

The objective of this project is to introduce the energetic youth extend the new modern teaching technique/method in government schools in chepang community.

The volunteers will help in designing new and innovative ways of teaching and not only teach the students in newer ways but also help teachers of the school learn better ways of teaching. Education is the best means to translate the dark side of this inhuman experience in the society.

This volunteering project will not only help the students and the school from Chepang community but also expose the current situation of the community to the outer world. The community can benefit from the exposure as people with reach can help in improving the backward society through this volunteering project. This will be a once in a lifetime experience for the volunteers to see and live the Chepang culture closely and know about them in person.

The volunteers will have to pay a minimum amount to cover their travel and accommodation expenses and the remaining logistic expenses will be managed by the supporting organization Self Sustaining Campaign Organization. Volunteers will be staying at Chepang individual homes decided by the Manager of Organization to ensure facilities of toilets and taps nearby. The volunteers will be assimilating and acculturating Chepang cultures with in a time periods of stay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Action Plan for One week

Days Activities/ Programs/Assignments for volunteers Remarks
Saturday Orientation / Understanding the Framework and Idea Observation
Sunday Assessment/ preparation of  working Strategic/ work Division Home visit/ Encourage Family to send their children in regular class Brief Information about Chepang community by Local
Monday Interaction with children’s and help them through Games: Ludo, Carrom, Badminton, Volleyball Games/ Fun / Rhymes/ Teaching, Antakshiri Awareness about Earthquake and Natural disasters Role Play on Earthquake
Tuesday Make Lesson Plan/ Teaching Awareness on natural disasters Awareness on Social Problems Documentary on Gambling
Wednesday Tree Plantation (Chiuri) Make Lesson Plan/ Teaching Drama on Alcoholism
Thursday Community Cleaning with Students.

Degradable and Non Degradablle wastes

Trekking/ Sight Seeing
Friday Free Medical Camp Camp fire/ Song Dance at Community
Saturday Farewell/ Bidding Good Bye Returning

Notes for Volunteers:

  • Carry sleeping bag on your own
  • First day and Second day will be based on rapport building and making connections.
  • After Third day volunteers will stay at home assigned by Bishwas Chepang ensuring minimal facilities like toilets and lights.
  • Again meet up and conduct a discussion with friends.
  • Wednesday Research based on Health, Education, Environment … topic to their interest

We know that you need nominal facilities to be part of it so lodging, fooding, security will be of our responsibility. You can write thesis, research paper dissertation paper, design a program on the data available in our interventions. You will be closely working with the team and will be supervised by concerned community people, guardians and even more direct supervision by Bishwas Chepang.

Bishwas Chepang representing “Self Sustaining Campaign” keeps all the rights to say “you are ineligible from today”, if conducted any misbehavior according to our Code of Conduct, Policy Guide line and Operation Guideline in and outside while you are volunteer in our institution”. You have to pay a nominal fee to be registered and enrolled as the volunteer. There is no age bar, institutions that operate volunteers and interns can have collaborative and strategic partnership with Self Sustaining Campaign. Once you are registered then you will get ToR from Self Sustaining Campaign for your tracking and performance.

 

Terms of Reference (ToR)

  1. Role of the village committee

– Manage proper stay for the Volunteers.

– Manage foods for daily consumption for the Volunteer.

– Prepare clean and hygienic stay and surrounding.

  1. Role of volunteers /what they should know??

– Be well prepared for your Talk show\

– Proper planning and create participatory interactive session in classes

– Report if any problem is aroused

– Take all the basic medicines they need.

– Need Assessments

– Submit report to the management committee (Bishwas Chepang)

 

  1. Role of Government schools teachers of that School

– Ensure that the volunteers are enjoying taking classes and help them if something is needed.

– Control if any students are showing delinquent acts.

– Be with volunteers for at least 10 minutes in the beginning of the class.

– Submit report to village committee and it will be forwarded to Bishwas Chepang

– The School should provide a letter of appreciation after the completion of volunteering.

 

  1. Role of Bishwas Chepang

– Submit report to Self Sustaining Campaign.

– Ensure volunteers’ safety.

– Ensure volunteers’ safe arrival and stay.

– Effective intermediaries.

– Manage pick up and drop services from villagers

– Collect funds and do the needful of budgeting

– Disseminate according to costs

  1. Role of Self Sustaining Campaign organization

– Manage budgeting, add if not sufficient amount has been raised.

– Connect/Link volunteers from national as well as international levels.

– Provide certificate of thank you letter/Certificate for volunteering at Chepang community.

 

Self Sustaining Campaign: A campaign to make Chepang Self Sustained.

Antare Chepang with his children's poosing for Photograph
Antare Chepang with his children’s poosing for Photograph

Self Sustaining Campaign for Chepang Community

Introduction to Chepang Community:

The Chepang are one of Nepal’s most disadvantaged indigenous groups and are classified under the ‘highly marginalized’ category on the basis of a set of socio-economic indicators, such as population size, language literacy rate, house type, landownership, occupation and access to higher education. Although no longer a nomadic tribe, the Chepangs have largely preserved their unique tribal identity by maintaining their traditional knowledge system and continuing to practice animism.The Chepangs inhabit in the hilly areas of the district of Nepal and is scattered mainly across the districts of Chitwan (40%), Makwanpur (29%), Dhading (20%) and Gorkha (5%) where the majority live in sheds made of tree branches.

Why Chepangs are always deprived/backward and highly marginalized?
Poverty:
According to the recent Nepal Living Standard Survey, almost 90 percent of Chepangs live below the poverty line, earning around 6,000 Nepali rupees per capita annually. Poverty dwindles the whole life process in acquiring education, getting health treatment and other fulfillment of basic necessities.

Education:
Immediate cause of vulnerability for Chepang is their lack of education. The Nepal Chepang Association (NCA) reported that more than three quarters of all Chepang are illiterate and that only one percent of Chepang women know how to read and write, compared to the national average of around 50 percent.

Until 2009, only two Chepangs had completed a Master’s degree, 21 (four female) a higher Secondary education and 127 (27 female) a School Leaving Certificate (grade ten).

Remoteness:
The remoteness of Chepang settlements is regarded as one of the main reasons behind these low literacy rates. Most Chepang villages have only a primary school and students need to travel three to five hours every day, usually over sloped and difficult terrain, to attend secondary level schools. Due to a lack of financial means, few Chepang students can afford to stay in hostels closer to educational facilities.

Lack of awareness:
A general lack of awareness of the importance of education among Chepang parents and the high prevalence of illiteracy also constitute a big obstacle for the education of their children. Faced with serious challenges in maintaining their livelihoods, many Chepang parents take their children out of school to help with household, agricultural and wage work. As a result, the dropout rate is very high among Chepang school children.

Unfertile land:
More stones at cultivating lands leading to less productions
Health:
Have to walk 7 hours to reach nearest medical centre of chitwan. So many youth die just because of non fatal diseases like diarrhea, excess fever, rabies, titanas etc

Our missions
Its objective is to contribute in supplying humanitarian supports for much deprived people combating against hunger, socio-economic backwardness, cultural crisis, all kinds of exclusion and marginalization.
Our ultimate goal is to enhance the wellbeing of needy people dwelling at remote settlements of Nepal. We do believe that this goal can be best attained if much attention is focused to health and education so far.

Prospects/Possibilities:
(i) Concept of SETTLERS: Philanthropists, researchers, students, anthropologists and stasticians will adopt a chepang life style and stay as settlers during their vacation for a day, week or month as per their demand.

(ii) Promote village tourism in the name of welfare and socio-cultural exchange program between rural and urban life.

(iii) In a nutshell, our activities there includes human health, animal health, animal husbandry, training’s on agriculture, distribution of seeds, survey of the whole village and brooding on a master plan for the transformation. The main aim of this article is to guide directions and help chepang people to become self sustained.
What we could do??
(A) Build a resource centre/ Community Learning Center:
Construct a building; (uses of building)
For official use
Collection of antiques, museum
Preservation of dresses
Can run adult literacy classes
Can conduct meetings
Provide trainings
Show documentaries related to KRISHI KARYAKRAM, livelihood transformations, influential shows.
Room for visitors
Place for researchers
Compile all the information about Chepang community and conduct filing and handling
Keep all the information required for (Help my study about Chepang Community)

(B) Immediate income generational activities: Minimizing poverty.
Poverty Minimization program for Chepang Community
To help them earn immediately, the following activities will be carried out:
(i) Distribution of chicks.
(ii) Bamboo rack, stool, hanger and other materials making.
(iii) Making wooden materials
(iv) Dhaka cloth weaving, handicrafts, chakati, gundri, doko, dalo, Namlo.
(v) Give training to make pickles of Aamala, citric fruits, mangoes as these fruits are available in large amount.
Sell these items and make earning out of it.
(C) Skill enhancement:
i) Animal husbandry training to rear goats, cow, chicken, duck, fish etc.
ii) Agriculture training for producing Tori, Kurilo, beans, faper, ginger, turmeric, potato etc.
iii) Horticulture training to plant and produce apple, citrus and other fruits.
iv) Technical training such as mason, carpenter etc.

(D) Education
Achieving Universal primary education not only contributes for development and protection of children, but also helps prohibit and prevent child labor exploitation, child trafficking, child soldiers, and children with disabilities and children in conflict with laws. This will also help to bring down the child marriage rate, corporal punishment and so on.
Quality education has been the major challenges
(i) Take volunteers to the government schools and teach for few days
(ii) Establish one nearest proximity school
(iii) Make a committee of literate or educated members of local chepang people and carry out baseline study to identify the problems and sort it.
(iv) ………………………………………………

(E) Health
To ensure the quality health, we will do the following activities:
i) Awareness campaign
ii) Toilet construction
iii) Maternal and Child health training
iv) Health camps from time to time
v) First aid training
vi) Adolescents health training and programs
vii) Family Planning

(F) Ensure Environmental Sustainability:
Every action of human beings needs to be environmentally friendly and sustainable. Otherwise, any development work no matter whether big or small will make an adverse effect to society. Environment sustainability will ultimately help reduce the problems like internal conflict, internal displacement.

Chepang traditionally practices some slash-and-burn agriculture, or simple hoe-based horticulture along with mostly hunting and gathering from the forests, which has adversely affected the environment of nearby villages. There almost no trees nearby villages.
(i) Tree plantation
1,00,000 Chiuri plantation – Holy tree of chepang community.
Find its usefulness: http://www.bishwaschepang.wordpress.com- interrelationship between Chepang and Chiuri plant
-Biswash Chepang
125bishwas@gmail.com

The lovely children of woods-Chepang Community

Background Information

Nepal is a multi ethnic, lingual, religious, and cultural country. Our country has more than one hundred ethnicity and caste group who speak more than 90 different languages. Indigenous people are descendents of the original inhabitants of many lands strikingly diverse in their cultures, religions and patterns of social and economic organizations. In simple word, the term ethnic groups or Janajatis refers to people with distinct language, culture, and native area.
Chepang are also one of those janajatis who lives in the upper slopes of the central region of the country. There are 81000 chepangs all over Nepal. More than 98% of the chepangs are residing in Chitwan, Makawanpur, Dhading, and Gorkha districts. Recently there has been increasing rate of migration for better opportunities. Now they are scattered to Gorkha, Tanahaun,Lamjung, Banke, Bardiya, Kailali, Nawalarasi and Bara districts.

Origin of chepang:
The word “chepang” is derived from the word Chyobang or Che Pang
Chyo means on the top ad bang means stone. In other words, people living in the hills. (Caulghly, Dahal, Bandhu, 1971). Chepangs claims that their ancestors lived and sheltered in caves and most believed that they originated from stone. However, in chepang language Che means dog and Pang means arrow. Therefore it is believed that they used to take dog and arrow in hunting long ago and they were named as Chepang.(Gurung, 1989)

Physical appearance : Round face, flat and shot nose, dark brown complexion, thin and medium ears dark eyes, medium height. In short they are in stature with Mongolian features.
Social life: The house of chepangs is narrow and small. They are two storied huts covered by thatched roofs. The huts are built on wooden pillars that are kept few feet below the ground. Wooden planks and muds fence the walls of these huts. The construction materials are easily available locally. The huts do not have separate compartments and it consists of only one single room. On right and one side of the corner of the kitchen a bamboo platform is placed which is used for drying goods such as meat corns etc. they have few utensils in the kitchen, earthen pots for water and aluminum for dishes. The mattress used by chepang people are made of paddy and millet straw, dried leaves of banana and wooden planks. They spread little ash under their mattress before sleeping on the ground or body to make themselves warm.

They claim that they belong to kirati goup of people. The chepang language belongs to Tibeto Burman strains.
Culture : culture provides identity to ethnic community . The chepangs have their own cultural practices including language, rituals, art and artifacts, personal behavior and tradition. The chepang worship the nature and they pray them. Before they consume new productions, they worship to the god in new season. They believe in witch doctors called Shaman ( Pandey/ Phal). The pande is the main person in the community. They invite pande to t rid off every type of sickness.
They have their own kulpuja (…………………………) called Tongkolan or Sangma. In this ceremony they sacrifice the Pig, he goat, Cock led by the oldest person of this community. They enjoy singing and dancing.
The bow and arrow is the main weapon of this community. This ethnic groups have their own ethnic songs. (A) Mansa geet (B) Eunrai geet
The Eunrai geet represents and describe human civilizations. This represents formation of the earth, the sun gives rays, the god takes space, and plant takes space.

The Mansa geet represents and describe the love story. These geet have own lyrics (laya) sung by the old age person of the society. They sing a song and ask questions and get answers from Kuldevta like Sime and Bhume. They sing this song at the time of harvesting.
Duties : among chepangs, women look after the household while men look after their affairs outside the house. The pande (shaman) takes leadership role in almost all the religious and social activities of the chepang society. The chepangs have the practice of propitiating ancestors (kulpuja) and observing dewali.

The Dhyangro is the unique baja in their community. The superstition is the main problem for development i n this society. The relationship between man and women is not based on domination. Women participate in every decision making process actively. The communal system, Parma system (labor exchange system) shows community has strong cohesion for social integration. After the death of husband women do not remove Sindhur, Pote but can remarry. The women do not hesitate to interact with each other.

Individual characteristics: Simple, trustworthiness, lazy, ashamed habit, does not want to understand the external thing and want to be far from outdoor environment, have the tolerant capacity, unmanaged residence, feeding, and dressing system and politeness are the individual habit and culture of chepang community.
The natural resource is the main source for their livelihood. They have indigenous knowledge to use the natural resource. however, it needs to be improved with new technology.
Life cycle:
Begins with birth ceremony, the naming ceremony (Nwaran), Pasni ceremony, the hair cutting ceremony (Chhewar), the marriage ceremony and the death ceremony.

Conception/ Birth: Offspring’s is considered as the blessing of god. A pregnant women and her husband have to follow certain taboos. To touch a dead body, kill snakes or any other animal is considered sinful. The pande gives the sacred rice and water to the mother for the safe delivery of the baby. Generally, father cuts the saal (umbilical cords) with the sterilized knife and buried in a safe place. The period of seclusion varies from ten days to one month. She resumes her normal work after one week for household activities.
The naming ceremony among chepangs takes place in the nine days after the birth of a child. During the ceremony the chepang shaman (pande) reads sacred texts over a cock, a hen, thread colored with turmeric, thin roti(bread) made of maize flour, totala flowers, egg and takes them outside for worship. The child and mother are tied with the thread; a child is given a name. The mother and mother and baby is purified by sunpani (water touched gold) and cow urine and tying a dorra (sacred thread) on the wrist of baby and mother.
After five or six month of babies, birth they start to feed with celebration feast to their relatives known as pasni. The chhewar is another ceremony but it is not important as this s transferred from the other higher caste.

Marriage ceremony: They accept the kinship marriage, inter caste marriage but the endogamous marriage is prohibited. The chepang community does the arranged mariage, capture marriage and love marriage. They welcome to the new couple with sacred diyo and tika. This community also accepts marriage with widow or widowers. This community accepts the marriage with high caste but does not accept with low caste. The chicken (cock from groom and hen from bride), alcohol, banana and jand (yeast) etc are the important things for marriage ceremony. In this ceremony they offer pigs, rakshi, banana, rice, fish etc. the figure 22 digit is very good digit for the marriage ceremony. The quantities of 22 dharni, pathi, kainyo kera, sikka are needed to complete the marriage.

The death ceremony: The death ceremony is another important culture of this community. The dead body is bathed and covered with white clothes and put garlands of flowers on their body and wrapped with burial cloth. The relatives of family comes to give last condolence with flowers, garland, red powder. The funeral procession is akin to the practices enshrined in the Hindu religion. They believes in rebirth after death of the peoples, so they prey to the god and carry out all the funeral procession as described by pande. After 13 days all kins and clans are purified from the day of departure. Chepang men wear single piece of clothes around their waist and women wear clothes similar to majetro up to their necks.

Religion: the religion of chepang is forest (bon). They worship nature. The chepangs follow animisms, although they are strongly influenced by both Hinduism and buddhism , which come from tamang just north of them. They observe all kinds of Hindu festivals of Dashain, Tihar, and sakrantis. Besides this their own tribal festivals are Nawagi which is performed on Tuesday during third week of Bhadra (between august and September). According to the 2001 Nepal census, there were 52,237 chepang people all over Nepal.

Social cohesion: The community has different type of social structures: Both homogeneous and heterogeneous settlements are found. They want to live in homogeneous settlements; as such, type of settlements is strong, consistent and has the strong social integrity. This community is gradually moving towards modernization. Information technology plays an important role to increase awareness. Due to poverty and vulnerability, they have no access to the resources. The patriarchal system dominates women but all women enjoy independence. The local elite class control natural and government resources.
The daily routine of the chepang community is to collect the feeding materials from the jungles to overcome famine period. They live in scarcity, hard life, and severe oppression by the local elite class. The homogeneous settlements have strong interrelation among them, democratic decision-making process, strong interrelation. After transformation into the heterogeneous settlement, they lose their own system and identity. The women participate in labor equal to man and they have strong social spirit. The labor exchange system is called Parma system.
Parma system is practiced in agricultural works, manufacture and building houses, cattle shed etc. They finish their production in Jand and Rakshi mostly. They are backward in education, health, sanitation, hygiene. In the name of chepang several nongovernmental organizations launches lots of programme but there is no satisfactorily change In their social and economic status.

Chepang Community research based on secondary data

The lovely children of woods-Chepang Community

Background Information

Nepal is a multi ethnic, lingual, religious, and cultural country. Our country has more than one hundred ethnicity and caste group who speak more than 90 different languages. Indigenous people are descendents of the original inhabitants of many lands strikingly diverse in their cultures, religions and patterns of social and economic organizations. In simple word, the term ethnic groups or Janajatis refers to people with distinct language, culture, and native area.
Chepang are also one of those janajatis who lives in the upper slopes of the central region of the country. There are 81000 chepangs all over Nepal. More than 98% of the chepangs are residing in Chitwan, Makawanpur, Dhading, and Gorkha districts. Recently there has been increasing rate of migration for better opportunities. Now they are scattered to Gorkha, Tanahaun,Lamjung, Banke, Bardiya, Kailali, Nawalarasi and Bara districts.

Origin of chepang:
The word “chepang” is derived from the word Chyobang or Che Pang
Chyo means on the top ad bang means stone. In other words, people living in the hills. (Caulghly, Dahal, Bandhu, 1971). Chepangs claims that their ancestors lived and sheltered in caves and most believed that they originated from stone. However, in chepang language Che means dog and Pang means arrow. Therefore it is believed that they used to take dog and arrow in hunting long ago and they were named as Chepang.(Gurung, 1989)

Physical appearance : Round face, flat and shot nose, dark brown complexion, thin and medium ears dark eyes, medium height. In short they are in stature with Mongolian features.

Social life: The house of chepangs is narrow and small. They are two storied huts covered by thatched roofs. The huts are built on wooden pillars that are kept few feet below the ground. Wooden planks and muds fence the walls of these huts. The construction materials are easily available locally. The huts do not have separate compartments and it consists of only one single room. On right and one side of the corner of the kitchen a bamboo platform is placed which is used for drying goods such as meat corns etc. they have few utensils in the kitchen, earthen pots for water and aluminum for dishes. The mattress used by chepang people are made of paddy and millet straw, dried leaves of banana and wooden planks. They spread little ash under their mattress before sleeping on the ground or body to make themselves warm.

They claim that they belong to kirati goup of people. The chepang language belongs to Tibeto Burman strains.
Culture : culture provides identity to ethnic community . The chepangs have their own cultural practices including language, rituals, art and artifacts, personal behavior and tradition. The chepang worship the nature and they pray them. Before they consume new productions, they worship to the god in new season. They believe in witch doctors called Shaman ( Pandey/ Phal). The pande is the main person in the community. They invite pande to t rid off every type of sickness.
They have their own kulpuja (…………………………) called Tongkolan or Sangma. In this ceremony they sacrifice the Pig, he goat, Cock led by the oldest person of this community. They enjoy singing and dancing.
The bow and arrow is the main weapon of this community. This ethnic groups have their own ethnic songs. (A) Mansa geet (B) Eunrai geet
The Eunrai geet represents and describe human civilizations. This represents formation of the earth, the sun gives rays, the god takes space, and plant takes space.

The Mansa geet represents and describe the love story. These geet have own lyrics (laya) sung by the old age person of the society. They sing a song and ask questions and get answers from Kuldevta like Sime and Bhume. They sing this song at the time of harvesting.
Duties : among chepangs, women look after the household while men look after their affairs outside the house. The pande (shaman) takes leadership role in almost all the religious and social activities of the chepang society. The chepangs have the practice of propitiating ancestors (kulpuja) and observing dewali.

The Dhyangro is the unique baja in their community. The superstition is the main problem for development i n this society. The relationship between man and women is not based on domination. Women participate in every decision making process actively. The communal system, Parma system (labor exchange system) shows community has strong cohesion for social integration. After the death of husband women do not remove Sindhur, Pote but can remarry. The women do not hesitate to interact with each other.

Individual characteristics: Simple, trustworthiness, lazy, ashamed habit, does not want to understand the external thing and want to be far from outdoor environment, have the tolerant capacity, unmanaged residence, feeding, and dressing system and politeness are the individual habit and culture of chepang community.
The natural resource is the main source for their livelihood. They have indigenous knowledge to use the natural resource. however, it needs to be improved with new technology.
Life cycle:
Begins with birth ceremony, the naming ceremony (Nwaran), Pasni ceremony, the hair cutting ceremony (Chhewar), the marriage ceremony and the death ceremony.

Conception/ Birth: Offspring’s is considered as the blessing of god. A pregnant women and her husband have to follow certain taboos. To touch a dead body, kill snakes or any other animal is considered sinful. The pande gives the sacred rice and water to the mother for the safe delivery of the baby. Generally, father cuts the saal (umbilical cords) with the sterilized knife and buried in a safe place. The period of seclusion varies from ten days to one month. She resumes her normal work after one week for household activities.
The naming ceremony among chepangs takes place in the nine days after the birth of a child. During the ceremony the chepang shaman (pande) reads sacred texts over a cock, a hen, thread colored with turmeric, thin roti(bread) made of maize flour, totala flowers, egg and takes them outside for worship. The child and mother are tied with the thread; a child is given a name. The mother and mother and baby is purified by sunpani (water touched gold) and cow urine and tying a dorra (sacred thread) on the wrist of baby and mother.
After five or six month of babies, birth they start to feed with celebration feast to their relatives known as pasni. The chhewar is another ceremony but it is not important as this s transferred from the other higher caste.

Marriage ceremony: They accept the kinship marriage, inter caste marriage but the endogamous marriage is prohibited. The chepang community does the arranged mariage, capture marriage and love marriage. They welcome to the new couple with sacred diyo and tika. This community also accepts marriage with widow or widowers. This community accepts the marriage with high caste but does not accept with low caste. The chicken (cock from groom and hen from bride), alcohol, banana and jand (yeast) etc are the important things for marriage ceremony. In this ceremony they offer pigs, rakshi, banana, rice, fish etc. the figure 22 digit is very good digit for the marriage ceremony. The quantities of 22 dharni, pathi, kainyo kera, sikka are needed to complete the marriage.

The death ceremony: The death ceremony is another important culture of this community. The dead body is bathed and covered with white clothes and put garlands of flowers on their body and wrapped with burial cloth. The relatives of family comes to give last condolence with flowers, garland, red powder. The funeral procession is akin to the practices enshrined in the Hindu religion. They believes in rebirth after death of the peoples, so they prey to the god and carry out all the funeral procession as described by pande. After 13 days all kins and clans are purified from the day of departure. Chepang men wear single piece of clothes around their waist and women wear clothes similar to majetro up to their necks.

Religion: the religion of chepang is forest (bon). They worship nature. The chepangs follow animisms, although they are strongly influenced by both Hinduism and buddhism , which come from tamang just north of them. They observe all kinds of Hindu festivals of Dashain, Tihar, and sakrantis. Besides this their own tribal festivals are Nawagi which is performed on Tuesday during third week of Bhadra (between august and September). According to the 2001 Nepal census, there were 52,237 chepang people all over Nepal.

Social cohesion: The community has different type of social structures: Both homogeneous and heterogeneous settlements are found. They want to live in homogeneous settlements; as such, type of settlements is strong, consistent and has the strong social integrity. This community is gradually moving towards modernization. Information technology plays an important role to increase awareness. Due to poverty and vulnerability, they have no access to the resources. The patriarchal system dominates women but all women enjoy independence. The local elite class control natural and government resources.
The daily routine of the chepang community is to collect the feeding materials from the jungles to overcome famine period. They live in scarcity, hard life, and severe oppression by the local elite class. The homogeneous settlements have strong interrelation among them, democratic decision-making process, strong interrelation. After transformation into the heterogeneous settlement, they lose their own system and identity. The women participate in labor equal to man and they have strong social spirit. The labor exchange system is called Parma system.
Parma system is practiced in agricultural works, manufacture and building houses, cattle shed etc. They finish their production in Jand and Rakshi mostly. They are backward in education, health, sanitation, hygiene. In the name of chepang several nongovernmental organizations launches lots of programme but there is no satisfactorily change In their social and economic status.

Livelihood Challenges for Chepangs

Bishwas Chepang / August 16, 2013
Livelihood Challenges

Lack of Land Ownership Certificates:

Originally nomadic, Chepangs used to survive through hunting, fishing and collecting edible roots and shoots from local forests. Most of the land suitable for crop cultivation was consequently occupied by more sedentary communities, and Chepangs were compelled to settle in sloped, arid and stony areas.Furthermore, the Private Forest Nationalization Act 1957 included all forest land that had previously been used under customary systems of rights and usage under the category of ‘government ownership’. There was no compensation for highly marginalized indigenous groups such as the Chepangs who had traditionally managed and used these forests. Non-recognition and the lack of legal protection of customary land rights have slowly eroded their access to areas they traditionally used for their livelihoods.

Nowadays, most Chepangs are subsistence farmers and their economy is based on forest resources and shifting cultivation; their only means of survival as they do not own productive land. “We do not own land because we lack citizenship certificates required for land ownership”, said local Chepangs in Makwanpur. A member of the NCA further noted that almost half of Chepang households have been denied registration certificates for land they have cultivated for centuries and that, in 2005, still two-thirds of the Chepang population was considered landless.

“Self sustaining campaign For Chepang community”

                                “Aatma Nirvar Aviyan” in Chepang village

 

Poverty minimization program for Chepang community:
                                    as a part of Self sustaining campaign in  Chepang village

 

                   The Chepangs are one of Nepal’s most disadvantaged indigenous groups and are classified under the ‘highly marginalized’ category on the basis of a set of socio-economic indicators, such as population size, language, literacy rate, house type, land ownership, occupation and access to higher education. Chepangs are gradually adopting a settled way of life, have very little arable land for cultivation and live on wild fruits like yam and air potato or wild greens such as nettles.

 

Currently,  I (Bishwas Chepang) have taken an initial step to minimize poverty through self sustaining campaign for Chepangs(Aatma Nirvar Abhiyan) in collaboration with Miteree foundation through poultry farming. I believe that the small effort can bring a great change in the aspects of fulfilling the basic needs of Chepang people in long term as well. Poultry farming is an effective and the quickest method where the community people can earn money in shorter period of time.

Immediate cause of vulnerability for Chepangs is due to lack of basic needs like food, clothes, shelter and education. The major cause of this vulnerability is Poverty. So I have a strong determination to help my community to overcome the poverty to some extent through poultry farming. The poultry products brought up by chepang people; after distribution of chicks will be solely for selling purpose and not for self-consumption. The chickens grown up will be collected by village coordinating committee led by Mr. Rabilal Chepang in local level and it is supplied to the market to urban area of Chitwan under the market management of Miteree foundation.

Little things we do to these vulnerable groups could help them to foster as well as uplift from the minimum life standard to average life standard. So that they can fulfill their basic needs like food, clothes and shelter from the next fiscal year.

 

The initiation is taken by Mr. Bishwas Chepang who completed A-level from Budhanilkantha School and currently  iam undergraduate  in social work from K and K International College, New Baneshwor. Being a member of chepang community, I would like to work for the welfare of my community. 

Autobiography

Bishwas Chepang

              My name is BishwasChepang and I was born on 30/06/1992. I was brought up in a single parent family as my mom left me when I was 4yrs old. As luck would have it, late Shree KishorKajiDhunganaopened a first school; Shree AntyodayaJanajati Aawasiya Vidhayalaya (community School) for chepangs. Learning Nepali was second language for me as we spoke our own Chepang language in the jungles. The when I was in 4th grade I won a prestigious scholarship from Pestalozzi Overseas Children’s Trust (POCT-UK) to study in the Nations best school, Budhnilkantha School with full scholarship in 2002. I completed my Advanced-levels in 2011- Cambridge University (UK) degree.
I did my Graduation in SOCIAL WORK from K and K College in New Baneswor, Nepal. My Bachelors degree education was supported by Miteree Foundation Nepal. I worked in Children sector for 4 years. 2011-2012in Orphanage at Kirtipur names Children Off The Street  (COTS Nepal), 2012-2014 in Underprivileged Children’s Educational Program (UCEP Nepal)Sanothimi, Bhaktapur  as a Facilitator. and Worked at Juvenile Correction  in close collaboration with Department of prison management and Home ministry since june 2015- April 2016.
Recently I have been selected by ERASMUS MUNDUS Scholarship Committee to Study Masters in Advanced Development in Social Work (ADVANCES) for Masters degree. This is a mobile program where i will be traveling to UK, Denmark, Poland, Portugal and France within 22 months. Currently iam at UK- University of Lincoln from September 17 till date.
Updated on 12/10/2016 –
University of Lincoln
Lincolnshire- LN5 7TS
42 Foster Street
UK